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20130104
20130112
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
army. despite the billions spent and the thousands of lives lost, the taliban has not been defeated. some say at the america pulls out too quickly, it will be trade promises made and leave afghanistan vulnerable. >> it will be difficult to engage down the road if there is a large al qaeda return or the taliban takes over the country, to get the afghanistan's to trust us when we say we will be there to help you. >> america described it as the final chapter in afghanistan. president obama downsized out of the ambitions, winding down the war that is increasingly unpopular at home. this is not the final chapter. that is just that americans have grown wary about spending the money and spilling the blood. >>> for more on the future of the u.s. mission, i spoke a short time ago with the former u.s. ambassador to afghanistan. ambassador, thank you very much for coming in. president obama says that things are going so well he can actually speed up the transition. are the afghan security forces really ready to take over in the spring or is this more a matter of expediency for both countries?
their camps. taliban infiltration is often to blame. the tactic is to undermine the relationship between afghan forces and the coalition partners, making it more difficult for the afghan military to take over security here. president karzai arrived in washington today. mapping out afghanistan's future after foreign combat troops have left. their meeting will determine the primary mission, to fight the taliban or to get rid of al qaeda. president karzai wants soldiers. his forces lead emissions across the country. they are still not ready. for many years to come, these soldiers in afghanistan generally will rely on america's support. >> for more on those meetings taking place, i spoke with peter bergen. what is the main sticking point in these meetings between what the white house wants and what president karzai wants? >> it is the question of immunity for american forces. the u.s. does not want its soldiers being prosecuted by an afghan accords for obvious reasons. this is a big sticking point. >> karzai would like that? >> yes. that is very much what he would like. and then there is the
as taliban momentum, and to give ourselves a bridge force to give us time to build up afghan security forces did i reluctantly come to the conclusion we're going to need more western forces, probably mostly american. we came up with detailed analysis on what we had to secure to be effective, and the requirement was for 40,000 forces. and so we recommended that which followed not long after our strategic assessment. >> rose: after the number of troops had already come in because of mckernen. >> yes. some of those forces hadn't yet arrived. >> rose: then you went to london. >> yes. >> rose: and you make a speech. the speech is okay. then there's a q&a session. >> yes. >> rose: and you say what. >> rose: i went to london at the request of the british government to engage parts of both their media and their government to explain the strategy. at that time we were executing a strategy that i had derived a mission strategy i derived from president obama's public statements his speeches in the spring when he authorized more forces and my understanding of what it is my mission was which had beg
pursuing peace talks with the taliban. as part of that process, the karzai government has urged pakistan to release more taliban fighters. four were freed last week after more than two dozen were released in the past few months. whatever comes of the peace efforts, president karzai said again today, he plans to step down next year. >> certainly, i will be a retired president and very happily in retirement. >> woodruff: karzai has been dogged by charges of fraud since his re-election, part of larger concerns about corruption in his government. he acknowledged the concerns today, and said he hopes for a proper election to name his successor. >> brown: we pick up on today's meeting with two men with extensive experience in managing u.s.-afghan relations. said jawad was afghanistan's ambassador to washington from 2003 to 2010. before that, he was president karzai's chief of staff. and peter tomsen was a career diplomat who served as special envoy on afghanistan during the george h.w. bush administration. he's the author of "the wars of afghanistan." peter tomsen, let's start with you. what j
on the type of targeting that is permissable if the u.s. helps pakistan with the pakistani taliban, then perhaps the u.s. can get away with its own targeting list. >> this strike raises two issues. there are questions about the legality of u.s. jone strikes -- drone strikes on pakistan and the ambivalent idea that there are good taliban and less good. ardo you think those issues will come up again? >> on legal issues it is ambiguous. the pakistan government says they don't want drone strikes but if it works out at a practical level they may accept them if there is joint targeting. >> this has happened before. and the u.s. has gone back to not acknowledging they are operating the drones. that is what they have re- introduced. and the question of good and bad taliban, if there is a chaotic civil war in afghanistan after the transition of coalition forces it will be bad for afghanistan but a disaster for pakistan. >> a man described as an al- qaeda operative in great britain was sent to the u.s. nazir was accused of planning to set off bombs in manchester but the fbi believes he is pa
valley, that's an area which had been controlled by the taliban just three years ago in the pakistani army came in, launched a sweeping operation to push them out but in recent months we've seen the taliban creeping back in a couple of weeks ago, a couple of months ago, rather we had an attack on the pakistani school girl malala yousafzai who was shot by the taliban and today we had this attack on a religious congregation hundreds had gathered to hear a leader speak in the main town and the death toll in that attack was 22 and was seen as another sign the taliban was not back in swat, certainly starting to reassert their authority there. >> pelley: there was a third attack in pakistan today, this one also in quetta. who was the target? >> earlier today there was a bomb attack on a pakistani paramilitary patrol in the center of quetta. that attack was carried out by a nationalist group that later claimed control -- rather that later claimed responsibility for attack. the ethnic nationalists have been fighting against the pakistani army, against the state for about seven or eight years
, they were far from ready. on the agenda this week will be progress in talks with the taliban. insurgents will be sent a warning. if karzai and the kabul regime agree with the presence of a single american soldier, they will also be a responsible for future hostilities, casualties, and destruction. some hoped the meeting will mean troops will pack up and head home sooner. that might help the peace process. >> if international troops withdraw from the country, the jihad against international invaders will be totally or more than 90% over. >> this meeting will influence the number of soldiers president obama is willing to send home and the number president karzai is willing to tolerate. this has changed into a war of counterterrorism. the interest of afghanistan and america will not be easily disentangled. across the country, u.s. bases are disappearing. this week's meeting will help determine the direction they take and the speed with which they go. >> silvio berlusconi has said he will not lead the next italian government. he struck a deal with the italian far right party. there are elect
months after the taliban tried to kill her for advocating education for girls. 15-year-old malala yousufzai was airlifted there after being shot in the head in october in pakistan's swat valley. today, the hospital in birmingham, england, released video and photographs of malala waving to the staff and hugging her nurses as she left on thursday. for now, she'll stay in britain with her family, and next month, she'll have skull reconstruction surgery. hundreds of thousands of palestinians rallied in gaza today in a rare show of support of the fatah movement there. the yellow flags of fatah were seen waving all over gaza in large squares, in processions, and from rooftops. it was the first such event since the rival group hamas seized power in gaza in 2007. hamas approved today's rally, and its prime minister voiced hopes for reconciling differences over how to deal with israel. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: the war in syria reached another grim milestone this week. the united nations estimated that the death toll from the almost two-year
that are the taliban and al qaeda. we have an unreliable ally in president karzai, he is erratic and this will cause him to be even more erratic and our own ally will be looking at us and saying, no, where is the united states going. no, judy, i think this was a highly injudicious statement. >> celeste ward gventer, an injudicious statement and bad idea? >> well i have the greatest respect for bing west and i'm honored to be on the show with him but i respectfully disagree. for us to be talking about troop levels right now putting the cart before the horse in any case. because frankly we should be talking about our vision for the region strategically. in any event we still need consider that having no troops there is a real option, and i think to ignore that option would be strategically foolish. we heard about the supposed apandora's box lips that was coming if u.s. troops left iraq. u.s. troops left iraq and the apocalypse has not arrive. that is an option for us and it would be irresponsible for us not to consider it. >> bing west, what is the argument for keeping a significant contingent of troo
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)